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By btidey
#79725 I have just started to try out the VS code development route and installed the basic extensions (c++, ms arduino).

My current arduino environment uses the 'portable' folder method as that allows me to have side by side esp8266 / esp32 hardware paths.

I'm not sure if the VS Code is going to work with this as the obvious method for bringing in the esp8266 support is by using the additional url method which I don't think will be compatible with the 'portable' method.

Anybody know if one can point VS Code arduino extension at the preferences / boards definitions more directly?
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By davydnorris
#79810 I use Eclipse and love it - I use it for both my native C/C++ coding and also for my Arduino work.

Eclipse supports Arduino development easily - you use the built in board and library manager to download the compiler toolchain and libraries, and you copy and paste your existing sketch into an Eclipse project as a file with the .cpp extension.

I've converted all my Arduino work over into Eclipse now.
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By rudy
#79821
davydnorris wrote:Eclipse supports Arduino development easily - you use the built in board and library manager to download the compiler toolchain and libraries, and you copy and paste your existing sketch into an Eclipse project as a file with the .cpp extension.

I would like to try this. Do you know of any current online instructions that I can follow?
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By McChubby007
#79822
rudy wrote:
davydnorris wrote:Eclipse supports Arduino development easily - you use the built in board and library manager to download the compiler toolchain and libraries, and you copy and paste your existing sketch into an Eclipse project as a file with the .cpp extension.

I would like to try this. Do you know of any current online instructions that I can follow?

I'm unclear if Davy uses the sloeber plugin for Eclipse, but if you use that it installs and configures Eclipse CDT, and all the relevant menu items are then present. Sloeber plugin can either be installed onto an existing Eclipse CDT, or you can download the sloeber Eclipse all-in-one. Creating a new 'Arduino' project from Eclipse creates all the necessary Eclipse settings for the project.

See http://eclipse.baeyens.it/index.shtml

I've used this for over 2 years now. It would be a nightmare to manually configure Eclipse so this is perfect. I prototype a lot of embedded code to run on the PC for testing, so this allows me to use one tool and the same code for all targets (subject to some stubs/emulation etc).

Eclipse is a personal favourite of mine as I've been using it for over 15 years, but it does have its detractors. If using platformIO (which is, to me, the next generation of cross-embedded/framework tool) it probably makes more sense to use VsCode, as PlatformIO is designed to work with it. Sorry if you already know all this !

PlatformIO : https://platformio.org/platformio-ide